Posts Tagged ‘Agriculture’

FAIM Hiring for New Position

Sunday, June 29th, 2014
Position open with FAIM Africa, Rwanda for experienced plant propagation manager skilled in all forms of plant propagation. i.e. tissue culture acclimatization, seed, RC, grafting, budding, and plant layering. Must hold bachelors degree from an accredited University. Must be self-starter with good work skills and one-year minimum tissue culture lab experience as well as one-year nursery experience.
Send current CV with references to sjones@faim.co between July 1st and July 7th, 2014. No applications will be accepted after the closing date of July 7, 2014

 

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Banana Plants for Food Security in Rwanda

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

 

 

Banana Plants for Food Security in Rwanda

Poor farming practices, floods, and other calamities have increased the risk of food insecurity in Rwanda. This has become a great burden in the country especially since almost 80% of its labor force works in agriculture. Agriculture also serves as the foundation of the country’s economy, accounting for 1/3 of Rwanda’s GDP. With continuous effort and through the help of various international agencies, most parts of the country are already experiencing improved food security. Clean, virus-free plants for food security are being cultivated, by the Rwandan/American owned corporation FAIM, such as banana plants, passion fruit plants, pineapple plants, and tamarillo plants.

Disease-resistant banana plants are now being grown not just in Rwanda but in other parts of Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Banana is an important cash and food crop that has unlimited uses. Strategies for increasing yields and creating a more diversified crop system as well as new technology for the production of banana plants and variants with the use of tissue culture are being introduced to exploit the under utilized potentials of bananas not just to improve the food security and nutrition in the country but also to improve livelihoods and increase income generation.

Forestry and Agriculture Investment Management (FAIM) is committed to helping increase food security in Africa by providing healthy, virus-free, and clean plants as well as sharing modern farming techniques to African farmers. They are working to provide disease-free starter plants that can be used for soil stabilization, food production, and commerce. FAIM also provides the necessary resources to help farmers achieve the best results, from cultivation to financing to marketing the harvested products. With the multiple benefits that the banana plants provide, it has become an essential tool in improving food security in Rwanda.

FAIM also has in development several banana plant varieties that are showing resistance to the fusarium that is found in the soil throughout Rwanda.

To reserve your banana plants, call FAIM or SMS +250 78 838 6266 for more information.

virus free banana trees

Beautiful banana trees.

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FAIM Bananas Bring Top Money at Farmer’s Market

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

 

 

When we took our banana bunches to market last week, the bunches brought top dollar. FAIM plants are performing beautifully for our customers and our own farm. Our tissue culture plants are clean, healthy and out performing other plants.    FAIM bananas at market in Rwanda

We are working towards food security for all of Rwanda.

While we are booking plants for the B planting season, we do have a limited number of banana, patchouli, tamarillo and passion fruit plants still in stock ready for farmers to plant.

To buy FAIM plants for your farm, phone us at: +250 78 838 6266

 

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Youth Must Be Encouraged Into Farming for the Future of Food Security

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

 

 

Our youth must be encouraged into farming as an occupation for the future of food security. Food Insecurity will continue to rise in Africa until governments understand and promote the importance of healthy, virus-free plants, along with proper farming techniques and to assist their farmers in purchasing these plants.

Government support of private companies specializing in disease free plants and farm education is, also, necessary to change the face of farming in these countries. Few governments, NGO’s or non-profit organizations can effectively tackle such projects for lack of management and long term grant funding, yet private industry can’t survive without the collaboration from the governments extending down to the farmers, as the farmers look to their governments for leadership.

Farmers continuing to grow or plant diseased plants keeps them in the vicious cycle of non-productivity. The old saying of ‘we’ve always done it this way’ must come to a stop. It’s a new day and with this day comes old problems requiring new tactics.

African farmers should be encouraged by their governments and provided assistance to obtain these plants, plant them so that with proper care, realize abundant harvests with which those farmers should not only be able to pay back their obligations, but provide a decent living for their families. Without this hope, the youth will continue to drift away from this avenue of employment.

FAIM is located in East Africa and currently producing clean healthy plants through propagation techniques such as clean seed sources, cuttings, divisions and tissue culture in our modern lab facilities. We ship plants to the countries of East Africa, West Africa, and Middle East. Our plants are healthy, virus-free plants for food security projects.

Article from All Africa on Experts Warn of Food Insecurity in East Africa

 

Africa (Eastern region)

Africa (Eastern region) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Plants for Food Security in Production for Rwandan Farmers

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

 

 

Plants for food security in production for Rwandan farmers. With majority of the banana plants diseased, majority of fruit production is currently being imported. Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM Africa) is propagating through tissue culture healthy disease-free plants for Rwandan farmers as well as all sub-Saharan countries and the Middle East.

Currently in production are the cooking bananas Injagi and Imporogoma, as well as Fhia 17 and Fhia 25 which are bananas primarily used for beer and desert. Available for shipping to areas outside Rwanda is FAIM’s own Sugar Baby Apple Banana, a banana that produces juice so sweet will have you doubting that is from a banana at all!

Call or visit our office in Kigali to discuss your planting needs. FAIM is currently taking orders for plants to be delivered during planting season B.

FAIM Africa ltd
KN 80, #9
Kigali, Rwanda
+25 (0)78 838 6266
Email: info@faim.co
FAIM1

FAIM1 (Photo credit: USDAgov)

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Kenya meeting and the development of a sustainable forestry and agricultural project for Africa

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

The year was 2007, and our newly formed company, FAIM (Forestry and Agriculture Investment Management) was invited by USDA, (United States Department of Agriculture) to travel Kenya to meet with representatives from 8 selected African countries to present our project. As mentioned in my last post, the point of the USDA Trade Missions to different countries is to take your “wares” to new markets. In our case the USDA liked our concept to help the farmers so much that they made an exception and featured FAIM to present to the visitors attending the mission meetings.

The concept is simple. FAIM would establish a state of the art plant propagation facility in Africa based on significant know-how and the latest research in tissue culture, lab and production techniques. We would produce a wide variety of plants for food security, foods for processing, erosion, reforestation and soil stabilization. FAIM would not be plant specific but would cater to the plant needs of that particular area of the world. FAIM would provide innovation with the latest scientific research to propagate the highest numbers of disease free plants for the best possible price of any facility of its kind in the world. More importantly FAIM would be a private business, selling plants, and would be profitable and therefore sustainable.

FAIM was given a meeting room to present our venue before a distinguished group, including government officials, representatives from Universities, and private sector business people. The meeting was a success and after the presentation everyone had questions. The next three days were very busy with everyone wanting our attention. It was in Kenya that we met the representatives from Rwanda.

I will not bore you with the details of the next five years through the development and the evolution of FAIM, but from time to time I may mention different subjects in a paragraph or two when the story may need depth.

The real story begins in 2011 when the decision was made for FAIM to begin business and develop its first facility in Rwanda.


To be continued in my next post.Steve
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The Beginning…..

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010
Map of Rwanda

Image via Wikipedia

Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM) is set to establish a state-of-the-art plant propagation nursery and tissue lab in Rwanda based on significant know-how in tissue culture and mass plant production techniques.Enhanced by Zemanta

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