Posts Tagged ‘Business and Economy’

Youth Must Be Encouraged Into Farming for the Future of Food Security

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

 

 

Our youth must be encouraged into farming as an occupation for the future of food security. Food Insecurity will continue to rise in Africa until governments understand and promote the importance of healthy, virus-free plants, along with proper farming techniques and to assist their farmers in purchasing these plants.

Government support of private companies specializing in disease free plants and farm education is, also, necessary to change the face of farming in these countries. Few governments, NGO’s or non-profit organizations can effectively tackle such projects for lack of management and long term grant funding, yet private industry can’t survive without the collaboration from the governments extending down to the farmers, as the farmers look to their governments for leadership.

Farmers continuing to grow or plant diseased plants keeps them in the vicious cycle of non-productivity. The old saying of ‘we’ve always done it this way’ must come to a stop. It’s a new day and with this day comes old problems requiring new tactics.

African farmers should be encouraged by their governments and provided assistance to obtain these plants, plant them so that with proper care, realize abundant harvests with which those farmers should not only be able to pay back their obligations, but provide a decent living for their families. Without this hope, the youth will continue to drift away from this avenue of employment.

FAIM is located in East Africa and currently producing clean healthy plants through propagation techniques such as clean seed sources, cuttings, divisions and tissue culture in our modern lab facilities. We ship plants to the countries of East Africa, West Africa, and Middle East. Our plants are healthy, virus-free plants for food security projects.

Article from All Africa on Experts Warn of Food Insecurity in East Africa

 

Africa (Eastern region)

Africa (Eastern region) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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FAIM Recognized in USDA blog

Saturday, January 26th, 2013

United States Department of Agriculture writes about FAIM in their blog.      Planting Seeds of Prosperity 

I want to make note that FAIM has not received any grant funding from any USDA program. We are funded by social investors and, soon to join our group, Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC is a U.S.development finance institution). FAIM was awarded funding from Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund.

plants for food security

Potting Day

 
Planting some of our tissue culture plants into larger containers. FAIM has banana, apple banana, passion fruit, tamarillo and pineapple plants for Rwandan farmers or shipping into nearby countries.

Contact us for pricing and availability.

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Kenya meeting and the development of a sustainable forestry and agricultural project for Africa

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

The year was 2007, and our newly formed company, FAIM (Forestry and Agriculture Investment Management) was invited by USDA, (United States Department of Agriculture) to travel Kenya to meet with representatives from 8 selected African countries to present our project. As mentioned in my last post, the point of the USDA Trade Missions to different countries is to take your “wares” to new markets. In our case the USDA liked our concept to help the farmers so much that they made an exception and featured FAIM to present to the visitors attending the mission meetings.

The concept is simple. FAIM would establish a state of the art plant propagation facility in Africa based on significant know-how and the latest research in tissue culture, lab and production techniques. We would produce a wide variety of plants for food security, foods for processing, erosion, reforestation and soil stabilization. FAIM would not be plant specific but would cater to the plant needs of that particular area of the world. FAIM would provide innovation with the latest scientific research to propagate the highest numbers of disease free plants for the best possible price of any facility of its kind in the world. More importantly FAIM would be a private business, selling plants, and would be profitable and therefore sustainable.

FAIM was given a meeting room to present our venue before a distinguished group, including government officials, representatives from Universities, and private sector business people. The meeting was a success and after the presentation everyone had questions. The next three days were very busy with everyone wanting our attention. It was in Kenya that we met the representatives from Rwanda.

I will not bore you with the details of the next five years through the development and the evolution of FAIM, but from time to time I may mention different subjects in a paragraph or two when the story may need depth.

The real story begins in 2011 when the decision was made for FAIM to begin business and develop its first facility in Rwanda.


To be continued in my next post.Steve
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