Posts Tagged ‘plants for sale ghana’

Youth Must Be Encouraged Into Farming for the Future of Food Security

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

 

 

Our youth must be encouraged into farming as an occupation for the future of food security. Food Insecurity will continue to rise in Africa until governments understand and promote the importance of healthy, virus-free plants, along with proper farming techniques and to assist their farmers in purchasing these plants.

Government support of private companies specializing in disease free plants and farm education is, also, necessary to change the face of farming in these countries. Few governments, NGO’s or non-profit organizations can effectively tackle such projects for lack of management and long term grant funding, yet private industry can’t survive without the collaboration from the governments extending down to the farmers, as the farmers look to their governments for leadership.

Farmers continuing to grow or plant diseased plants keeps them in the vicious cycle of non-productivity. The old saying of ‘we’ve always done it this way’ must come to a stop. It’s a new day and with this day comes old problems requiring new tactics.

African farmers should be encouraged by their governments and provided assistance to obtain these plants, plant them so that with proper care, realize abundant harvests with which those farmers should not only be able to pay back their obligations, but provide a decent living for their families. Without this hope, the youth will continue to drift away from this avenue of employment.

FAIM is located in East Africa and currently producing clean healthy plants through propagation techniques such as clean seed sources, cuttings, divisions and tissue culture in our modern lab facilities. We ship plants to the countries of East Africa, West Africa, and Middle East. Our plants are healthy, virus-free plants for food security projects.

Article from All Africa on Experts Warn of Food Insecurity in East Africa

 

Africa (Eastern region)

Africa (Eastern region) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Enhanced by Zemanta
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email Rss