Posts Tagged ‘Tissue culture’

FAIM Hiring for New Position

Sunday, June 29th, 2014
Position open with FAIM Africa, Rwanda for experienced plant propagation manager skilled in all forms of plant propagation. i.e. tissue culture acclimatization, seed, RC, grafting, budding, and plant layering. Must hold bachelors degree from an accredited University. Must be self-starter with good work skills and one-year minimum tissue culture lab experience as well as one-year nursery experience.
Send current CV with references to sjones@faim.co between July 1st and July 7th, 2014. No applications will be accepted after the closing date of July 7, 2014

 

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Pineapple Plants: A Key Towards Improving Food Security in Rwanda

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

 

 

Pineapple Plants: A Key Towards Improving Food Security in Rwanda 

Pineapple production is considered as one of the key sources of economic growth in Rwanda. However, in the past, most pineapple farmers in the country have been relying on purchasing suckers from other countries including Uganda. This increased the risk of plant disease, decreased the quality of the products, and raised the costs of production. To help address this issue, Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM) has been growing virus-free pineapple plants as well as tamarillo, passion fruits, and tissue culture grown banana plant varieties.

The company has also introduced new farming techniques and practices that will help farmers have clean and healthy plants for better food security in Rwanda. FAIM provides Rwandan farmers that opportunity to increase the production of pineapple plants or grow quality produce that they can sell in the local market for added income. FAIM is dedicated to providing farmers in the country with specific solutions to various challenges that they are experiencing to ensure the pineapple production is environmentally and socially sustainable.

FAIM has healthy MD2 pineapple plants that have been grown to ensure that they will are disease free. FAIM’s  pineapple plantlets are ideal for pineapple cultivation since they are resistant to wilt disease, root rot, mealy bugs, and nematodes, and are free from common pathogens.

Pineapple is one of the plants for food security in Rwanda that can help improve the overall quality of life of Rwandan people. With FAIM’s help, increasing agricultural productivity and improving food security is now made easier to achieve.

MD-2 Pineapple

MD-2 Pineapple

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Passion Fruit Plants for Food Security in Rwanda

Saturday, March 8th, 2014

 

 

Passion Fruit Plants for Food Security in Rwanda

Passion fruit plants are the most abundant type of backyard crops that are commonly sold in the market as juices that supplies nutrients and vitamins in the body.  It is a seasonal fruit with round or oval shape and contains white or even purple flowers. It has sometimes yellow or purple black that are eaten or make into juices. It does not only enhance flavors and aroma of foods but also gives energy and nutrient to the body.

For people who are not yet familiar with this type of plants for food security in Rwanda would completely answer their needs.  FAIM is known for producing these disease free plants that are commonly planted by local people for their daily consumption and needs. To be able to help the people out, FAIM is already helping improve the country’s food security with passion fruit plants and other cash crops such as tissue culture banana plants and pineapple plants.

Passion fruit still on the vine

Passion fruit still on the vine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM) is not just giving people with a wide array of knowledge regarding the plant but also teaching them how to plant and take good care of this passion fruit plants.  These passion fruits plants for food security are already ready to be planted in the fields.

So, what are you waiting for? Call FAIM or SMS at +250 78 838 6266 more about the food security in Rwanda through passion fruit plants and how to purchase healthy passion fruit plants.

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Tamarillo Plants: A Healthy and Efficient Tissue Culture Plants

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

 

 

Tamarillo Plants: A Healthy and Efficient Tissue Culture Plants

Apart from the banana plants and pineapple plants, Rwanda is also known for producing tamarillo plants in an effort to increase its food security. Since they wanted to make use of tissue culture plants to boost up the farming practices of Rwandan farmers, Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM) is able to provide healthy disease free tamarillo plants.

Tamarillo plants for food security are healthy and make the life of Rwandan farmers fruitful with the production of huge number of fruits. FAIM maintains  inventory in tamarillo plants for farmers to immediately plant in their fields.

Tamarillo CDC

Tamarillo CDC (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

FAIM is offering tamarillo plants in order to assure that they will be given right amount of nutrients and at the same time provide them with a healthy and wealthy living. People who will be planting tamarillo plants to improve food security in Rwanda can become successful since they would be given an excellent chance to achieve the essential benefits brought by the plant.

So, don’t miss the chance of getting in touch with FAIM if you want to help improve the food security in Rwanda though tamarillo plants for food security.  You will be given an idea on how to be able to plant and take good care of your tamarillo plants in order to give you effective and healthy benefits through the production of their fruits. Call FAIM or SMS +250 78 838 6266  for more information regarding the tamarillo plants available for planting.

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FAIM Bananas Bring Top Money at Farmer’s Market

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

 

 

When we took our banana bunches to market last week, the bunches brought top dollar. FAIM plants are performing beautifully for our customers and our own farm. Our tissue culture plants are clean, healthy and out performing other plants.    FAIM bananas at market in Rwanda

We are working towards food security for all of Rwanda.

While we are booking plants for the B planting season, we do have a limited number of banana, patchouli, tamarillo and passion fruit plants still in stock ready for farmers to plant.

To buy FAIM plants for your farm, phone us at: +250 78 838 6266

 

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Plants in January

Thursday, January 24th, 2013
Passion Fruit Plants

Passion Fruit plants growing on field trellises.

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Bamboo Plants

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Bamboo plants ready to ship out to customers for erosion control, barriers, and long term growth for harvesting.

Contact FAIM for pricing and availability of bamboo plants for your bamboo forest!

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Kenya meeting and the development of a sustainable forestry and agricultural project for Africa

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

The year was 2007, and our newly formed company, FAIM (Forestry and Agriculture Investment Management) was invited by USDA, (United States Department of Agriculture) to travel Kenya to meet with representatives from 8 selected African countries to present our project. As mentioned in my last post, the point of the USDA Trade Missions to different countries is to take your “wares” to new markets. In our case the USDA liked our concept to help the farmers so much that they made an exception and featured FAIM to present to the visitors attending the mission meetings.

The concept is simple. FAIM would establish a state of the art plant propagation facility in Africa based on significant know-how and the latest research in tissue culture, lab and production techniques. We would produce a wide variety of plants for food security, foods for processing, erosion, reforestation and soil stabilization. FAIM would not be plant specific but would cater to the plant needs of that particular area of the world. FAIM would provide innovation with the latest scientific research to propagate the highest numbers of disease free plants for the best possible price of any facility of its kind in the world. More importantly FAIM would be a private business, selling plants, and would be profitable and therefore sustainable.

FAIM was given a meeting room to present our venue before a distinguished group, including government officials, representatives from Universities, and private sector business people. The meeting was a success and after the presentation everyone had questions. The next three days were very busy with everyone wanting our attention. It was in Kenya that we met the representatives from Rwanda.

I will not bore you with the details of the next five years through the development and the evolution of FAIM, but from time to time I may mention different subjects in a paragraph or two when the story may need depth.

The real story begins in 2011 when the decision was made for FAIM to begin business and develop its first facility in Rwanda.


To be continued in my next post.Steve
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How it all started

Sunday, January 30th, 2011
Madagascar Kids 3
Image by babasteve via Flickr

In 2005, I was invited on the USDA Trade Mission to South Africa and in a last minute effort, added a stop to Madagascar. I found the people of Madagascar to be friendly, kind and happy. To observe them was to see individuals who were busy, going and doing. Their island country was beautiful with much flora and fauna, it still came with its problems. Deforestation is a critical issue in many areas where clear cutting is being done without any replanting.  Even though I only visited this charming place for a few days, it stayed with me well onto the next stop in South Africa.

The point of the USDA Trade Missions to different countries is to take your “wares” to new markets. As much as I wanted to try to offer all of these people something, I had nothing that they could possibly need or that could help their situation. While attending meetings in South Africa, my thoughts of how I could possibly help countries solve some of their agricultural and erosion issues and allow the people to benefit as well. Between meetings and during evenings, I had long conversations with my wife who was back home in the states. She and I brainstormed on possible projects that could be done to help both land and its people. Before I left South Africa, we had created our basic plan.

Once I returned home, we worked long hours to further develop our plan. Hardly a few months after returning from Madagascar and South Africa, I had another USDA Trade Mission to attend in Kenya. The director of the Trade Missions kept informed of the progress of our new project. He was an early cheerleader of this concept and set aside time at the Kenya meeting of local businessmen to introduce it as a solution to help control erosion issues within their countries and to work with their farmers.

To be continued in my next post.

Steve

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The Beginning…..

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010
Map of Rwanda

Image via Wikipedia

Forestry and Agricultural Investment Management (FAIM) is set to establish a state-of-the-art plant propagation nursery and tissue lab in Rwanda based on significant know-how in tissue culture and mass plant production techniques.Enhanced by Zemanta

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